Archive for the ‘News’ Category

UT Dell & State Senator Kirk Watson Misspending Central Healthcare Funds?

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Are UT Dell Medical School and State Senator Kirk Watson
Misspending Central Healthcare Hospital District Funds?

Austin, 2:30 pm: UT Dell Medical School appears to be misspending taxpayer dollars committed to the Central Healthcare Hospital District. If they are, this raises serious questions about potential violations of law and the public trust, so says longtime reform attorney, Fred Lewis and former State Senator Gonzalo Barrientos (D-Austin). Linda Curtis of Independent Texans is raising questions about her own State Senator, Kirk Watson’s law firm having benefited from it.

From UT's own financial records, the reports shows 84% of all UT Dell Medical School compensation is paid for with Central Health funds and the vast majority of these expenditures are going to personnel who do not provide any health care of any kind.

Linda Curtis of Independent Texans PAC said, “Everyone knows that Senator Watson has been the leading cheerleader for building the medical school, which is fine. However, when he failed to pass legislation in 2011 (SB 821) to authorize Central Health to help pay for medical education, I believe he continued to find ways to get his way. Senator Watson nor UT can now claim that in 2012, when Travis County voters gave the Health District the right to increase property taxes, they also gave them the power to do what SB 821, in its failure, did not do for them. Spending tens of millions of dollars per year -- for things other than health care -- is a rip off of low-income citizens, not to mention all who are paying for it.”

Lewis remarked that, “No other hospital district in Texas, to our knowledge, has funded a medical school’s non-health care services. Hospital districts typically contract with medical schools to provide health care for the poor, but no hospital district other than Central Health funds non-health care services of medical schools.”

Former longtime State Senator for the Austin area, Gonzalo Barrientos, helped draft the bill that passed in the 2003 legislative session to allow for the creation of the Central Healthcare Hospital District. Barrientos commented, “My intent in passing the law that we passed in the legislature was to create a district that medically treated poor people, not tomorrow, not next week, not next year but right now when they’re hurting.”

Senator Kirk Watson is a partner at Husch Blackwell LLP. The firm represents Central Healthcare Hospital District and has paid Watson's firm over $3 million.

For more details on matters contained in this release, see these 4 charts and the Fred Lewis report.

For More Information:

Linda Curtis, Independent Texans, PAC 512-657-2089

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Letter to Join Texans for Electoral Competition

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Texans for Electoral Competition

Hello Friends:

The signers of this letter represent an array of Texans across party lines and ideology that recently formed a coalition -- Texans for Electoral Competition. TEC intends to engage in supporting and opposing legislation in the 2017 legislative session to open up electoral competition for all Texans. You are receiving this letter to invite you to join our coalition.

Our broad concern -- one that grew out of what we all witnessed in this last election -- is that the major party machines have worked to shut down competition within their parties and from those outside the two-party duopoly. Yet, a clear plurality of voters since the 2002 Gallup poll have self-identified as “independent” and a majority of major party voters expressed clear support for “more choices”.

Our specific goals in the 2017 Texas Legislative Session are to:

*  Win fair ballot access for independent candidates and other parties.
*  End "one-punch" straight ticket voting thereby encouraging voters to learn more
about  individual candidates, their platforms and qualifications.
*  Protect petition rights, a right Texans have enjoyed in home rule cities since 1912.
*  Protect the integrity of our elections and ensure that they are verifiable.
*  Support real redistricting reform.

The coalition meets every Wednesday night for 1-hour conference calls from  6:30 to 7:30 pm. Please join us on the call and bring your questions. Contact one of us below to get call information.

We are planning a lobby day on Friday, March 24th at the Capitol to be followed by a panel at the “Texas Populism” conference on Saturday, March 25th in Cedar Creek. Mark your calendars and watch for event details.

Click here for a paper — Death By a Thousand Signatures — by attorney Oliver Hall, a founder and counsel to the Center for Competitive Democracy in Washington, D.C.. His paper lays out some important history about how, over the last 50 years, America’s political system has become a virtual monopoly by the major party machines.

Thank you for caring about our democracy and we look forward to speaking with you and your organization.

For now, please consider liking and sharing our Facebook page - http://www.facebook.com/txelections.

Sincerely,

TEXANS FOR ELECTORAL COMPETITION

Linda Curtis, League of Independent Voters, Volunteer Coordinator 512.213.4511
katija gruene, Secretary, Green Party of Texas, 210.471.1791
Mark Miller, Libertarian Party of Texas, Vice-Chair, 512.789.6957
Mike Lewis, Left Up to Us, 719.337.6635

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Sweet Little Victory…TX Water Board opens conference, y’all come!

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The Texas Water Development Board heeded our insistence that their two-day conference starting tomorrow at UT’s AT&T Conference Center is a public meeting. That means the door is open (without the $525 charge!) so long as you do not eat or drink. We hear there are plenty of public water fountains!

If you’re going, just check in with the lovely people at the Registration Desk, get your badge and packet, and enjoy.

Click here to the Conference Page

We can use some help taping some of the sessions and have extra tape recorders.

Text us at 512.657.2089 or call the main number at 512.213.4511 and leave a message –- the message is then sent to us -- or reply to this email for more information.

We owe a huge thank you to the Freedom of Information Foundation of Texas, and one of their volunteer attorneys who happened to be on call that day, while on vacation mind you – Austin’s own open government watchdog, Bill Aleshire. No doubt, Aleshire’s finesse and knowledge of the law made a huge difference. FOIFT is a non-profit organization dedicated to transparency in Texas government.

Reminder! Join the Conference CALL this Wednesday night at 8 pm. We’ll report on the TWDB Conference – and LIV’s legislative agenda and tactics -- and give you a head start on the expected chaos at the 2017 Texas legislative session.

Call your Dial-In Number: (515) 739-1544
Enter your Access Code: 276555

LIV Board Member Jeff Harper will be in Arlington THIS Saturday with Linda Curtis of Independent Texans PAC. Linda will speak at 1:15 on “Petition Rights: The Source of Citizen Power to Take Back Their Towns”. More here

Here's today's Statesman story on the TWDB open government tussle.

Here's today's Austin Monitor story too!

Take back your towns and Texas, join the LIV and get involved!

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Release: Texas Water Developmet Board Violating Open Government Laws

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For Immediate Release                                                                        January 23, 2017

League of Independent Voters of Texas Claims Texas Water Development Board
in Violation of Texas Open Meetings Act

The people of Texas have a vital interest in water.  Yet, the Texas Water Development Board is, in essence, holding a secret meeting--what they call a "unique opportunity" available only to their invited presenters and those who pay $525 to attend--to set their course on water allocation issues.  If there was ever an issue where transparency should rule and dissenting opinions ought to be heard, it is the big issue of water.

The Texas Water Development Board, the state agency responsible for water planning, and financial and technical assistance services to the citizens of Texas, is holding a “closed meeting” in violation of six sections of the Texas Open Meetings Act (TOMA), according to the non-profit League of Independent Voters of Texas (LIV). LIV members are active in water planning and preservation in Central Texas, and, along with other interested persons, desired to attend the Water for Texas 2017 meeting being hosted by TWDB on January 23-25, 2017, only to discover that the meeting is not open to the public unless they pay $525.

Attorney and Texas open government expert Bill Aleshire issued this warning letter to TWDB on behalf of LIV late Sunday afternoon, stating:

“Upon review of the information available on the TWDB website about this meeting, it appears to me that it constitutes a violation of the Texas Open Meetings Act (TOMA), Tex. Gov’t Code sections 551.002 (open meetings requirement); 551.023 (right of attendee to record the meeting); 551.041, 551.044, and 551.048 (meeting notice requirements); 551.144 (closed meeting criminal offense).”

Further, Aleshire suggested the following remedy:

“We encourage the TWDB to reconsider the way this event is being handled and, at a minimum, announce that the meeting is open to any member of the public who desires to attend and exercise their rights provided by the Texas Open Meetings Act.”

LIV Board member Michele Gangnes is a landowner and attorney who has fought for the last seventeen years to protect the coveted Simsboro formation of the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer underlying Lee, Burleson, Milam and Bastrop counties. Gangnes said,

“This event is an extension of the way the public was treated during the interim session by State Senator Charles Perry, reappointed by Lt. Governor Dan Patrick to chair the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Water and Rural Affairs. Those most personally affected by the battles over groundwater were rebuffed when they requested the opportunity to testify with other invited witnesses at Perry’s interim committee hearings. Now those same rural landowners who want both to conserve the groundwater they own and protect our aquifers from being drained by profiteers, to the detriment of all Texans, are effectively excluded once again. TWDB’s high dollar event will provide access to decision-makers by those same water purveyors, municipalities and special interests already favored by Senator Perry.”

LIV Board member, Samantha Davis, of Cedar Park said,

"Rural landowners and suburbanites have common interests. We cannot allow slick special interests to sip champagne and deal away what belongs to us. These big shots want to drain our wallets as dry as they want to drain the aquifers. Folks must have access to meetings. That’s the law.”

The Water for Texas conference, hosted by TWDB, features two statewide officials, Lt. Governor Dan Patrick and Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar and five members of the Texas Senate and House. Additional participants include Texas Tribune CEO Evan Smith and a host of leaders from business, large-scale agriculture, local government and environmentalists. Noticeably missing are representatives of small farming interests and those who opposed the Constitutional Amendment known as Proposition 6 on the 2013 statewide ballot. Prop 6 set up a funding mechanism, run by the new Governor-appointed, paid TWDB Board, for financing the billions of dollars worth of projects in the state water plan.

For more information:

LIV Office: 512-213-4511

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Breaking…TWDB Violating Texas Open Meeting Laws

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The people of Texas have a vital interest in water.  Yet, the Texas Water Development Board is, in essence, holding a secret meeting—what they call a "unique opportunity" available only to their invited presenters and those who pay $525 to attend--to set their course on water allocation issues.  If there was ever an issue where transparency should rule and dissenting opinions ought to be heard, it is the big issue of water.

Attorney and Texas open government expert Bill Aleshire, issued a warning letter to TWDB on behalf of the League of Independent Voters (LIV) late Sunday afternoon. LIV is demanding the TWDB follow the Texas Open Meetings Act by allowing the public into this public event at no charge. Contact us if you'd like to attend this event on Tuesday or Wednesday AND..

Most important! Plan to join us on a statewide conference call this coming Wednesday night at 8 pm. Call instructions below:

Call your Dial-In Number: (515) 739-1544
Enter your Access Code: 276555

For Immediate Release                                                            January 23, 2017

League of Independent Voters of Texas Claims Texas Water Development Board
in Violation of Texas Open Meetings Act

The people of Texas have a vital interest in Water.  Yet, the Texas Water Development Board is, in essence, holding a secret meeting--what

they call a "unique opportunity" available only to their invited presenters and those who pay $525 to attend--to set their course on water allocation issues.  If there was ever an issue where transparency should rule and dissenting opinions ought to be heard, it is the big issue of Water.

The Texas Water Development Board, the state agency responsible for water planning, and financial and technical assistance services to the citizens of Texas, is holding a “closed meeting” in violation of six sections of the Texas Open Meetings Act (TOMA), according to the non-profit League of Independent Voters of Texas (LIV). LIV members are active in water planning and preservation in Central Texas, and, along with other interested persons, desired to attend the Water for Texas 2017 meeting being hosted by TWDB on January 23-25, 2017, only to discover that the meeting is not open to the public unless they pay $525.

Attorney and Texas open government expert Bill Aleshire issued this warning letter to TWDB on behalf of LIV late Sunday afternoon, stating:

“Upon review of the information available on the TWDB website about this meeting, it appears to me that it constitutes a violation of the Texas Open Meetings Act (TOMA), Tex. Gov’t Code sections 551.002 (open meetings requirement); 551.023 (right of attendee to record the meeting); 551.041, 551.044, and 551.048 (meeting notice requirements); 551.144 (closed meeting criminal offense).”

Further, Aleshire suggested the following remedy:

“We encourage the TWDB to reconsider the way this event is being handled and, at a minimum, announce that the meeting is open to any member of the public who desires to attend and exercise their rights provided by the Texas Open Meetings Act.”

LIV Board member Michele Gangnes is a landowner and attorney who has fought for the last seventeen years to protect the coveted Simsboro formation of the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer underlying Lee, Burleson, Milam and Bastrop counties. Gangnes said,

“This event is an extension of the way the public was treated during the interim session by State Senator Charles Perry, reappointed by Lt. Governor Dan Patrick to chair the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Water and Rural Affairs. Those most personally affected by the battles over groundwater were rebuffed when they requested the opportunity to testify with other invited witnesses at Perry’s interim committee hearings. Now those same rural landowners who want both to conserve the groundwater they own and protect our aquifers from being drained by profiteers, to the detriment of all Texans, are effectively excluded once again. TWDB’s high dollar event will provide access to decision-makers by those same water purveyors, municipalities and special interests already favored by Senator Perry.”

LIV Board member, Samantha Davis, of Cedar Park said,

“Rural landowners and suburbanites have common interests. We cannot allow slick special interests to sip champagne and deal away what belongs to us. These big shots want to drain our wallets as dry as they want to drain the aquifers. Folks must have access to meetings. That’s the law.”

The Water for Texas conference, hosted by TWDB, features two statewide officials, Lt. Governor Dan Patrick and Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar and five members of the Texas Senate and House. Additional participants include Texas Tribune CEO Evan Smith and a host of leaders from business, large-scale agriculture, local government and environmentalists. Noticeably missing are representatives of small farming interests and those who opposed the Constitutional Amendment known as Proposition 6 on the 2013 statewide ballot. Prop 6 set up a funding mechanism, run by the new Governor-appointed, paid TWDB Board, for financing the billions of dollars worth of projects in the state water plan.

For more information:

LIV Office: 512-213-4511

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Back in the Saddle Again…in Jeddo

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This message is a community alert involving an area where these four counties converge -- Bastrop, Caldwell, Fayette & Gonzales (in the Jeddo community). (This late notice was unavoidable, sorry!)

We here at the non-profit League of Independent Voters of Texas are back in the saddle again both in Jeddo and getting ready for the 2017 legislative session. The session just started yesterday!

A groundwater permit hearing has been called by the Plum Creek Conservation District for 1 pm on Tuesday, January 17, at 1101 W. San Antonio, Lockhart, Texas. The hearing is about two planned wells in the Jeddo area to move 4700 acre-feet of groundwater to the San Marcos and Kyle areas.

Join us THIS Saturday at 10 am at the Delhi Community Center
6108 Highway 304, Rosanky, TX 78953 (just south of Hwy. 713, on TX-304)
If you cannot make it Saturday, call us or join us at the hearing Tuesday.
Please help us reach these landowners or anyone interested.

Are you or do you know any of these 500 landowners who could be affected?  Click here for Bastrop here for Caldwell, here for Gonzales and here for Fayette counties.

Remember, the League is an all-volunteer membership organization. We do not endorse candidates, though we do hold candidate forums and we do engage in citizen engagement in policy and legislative decisions. Our key goals this year are the same -- to protect water and land resources and to increase electoral competition. This session, on the heels of this highly contentious election, may provide some surprising openings IF we organize ourselves together outside the warring parties.

Mark Your Calendars for the first statewide conference call:  Wednesday, January 25, 8 pm. Reply for call-in instructions.

Watch for more real news real soon and please share this message from our website here or here from our Facebook page. Thank you!

New Years resolutions you might really keep: join or re-up your membership in the League and ask your friends to join our email list or facebook network.

Saddle up or be saddled, y'all.

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Remember the legislature, like the Alamo!

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You haven't heard from us much this year because the Texas legislature meets only every Simsboro Aquifer Water Defense Fundother year. (It will convene again in January 2017). Also, one of  us -- Michele Gangnes -- joined with other landowners and attorneys to protect the Simsboro in the legal battles unfolding. They founded the Simsboro Aquifer Water Defense Fund (SAWDF) that just recently launched their spiffy new website here. Please consider donating to SAWDF (click on their name just above).

Sen. Craig Estates, House Natural Resources CommitteeALERT -- Two Legislative Hearings on Water this Thursday in Austin!

Please check out this notice from SAWDF about hearings taking place in Austin THIS Thursday. Please contact us here at the League (reply or call us) if you want more information. Some of us will be driving over from the Bastrop area and hope to see you there.

Also, please note that the Lost Pines Groundwater Conservation District is having a specially called meeting tomorrow at 6 pm (agenda here) at the Bastrop Convention Center. This meeting is about the City of Bastrop's permit request. We are very sympathetic to the city getting its water needs met. This is a small permit for only 2,000 acre-feet per year. However, we do have concerns about how LPGCD is handling landowner rights in this case and in the End Op, L.P. mega-permit for 46,000 acre-feet. (Check out the NEWS section of the SAWDF website for End Op news.)

We hope to see you tomorrow or Thursday! Again, let us know if you want to ride with someone.

PS You're invited to become a member of the League of Independent Voters or to renew your yearly dues! Thank you ahead of time

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Media Advisory: Lost Pines GCD expected to capitulate 46,000 acre-feet to End-Op

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Media Advisory for
August 10, 2016
For more info contact:
Linda Curtis, 512-657-2089

Bastrop, Texas
Lost Pines Groundwater Conservation District Expected to
Capitulate to End Op, L.P. Water Grab

The Lost Pines Groundwater Conservation District has been under fire by water marketers, Screen Shot 2016-06-10 at 7.10.28 PMmunicipalities and legislators for the last fifteen years for taking a conservative "go-slow" approach to mining the aquifer underlying Lee and Bastrop counties. The District's strongest advocates have always been landowners and residents who early on fought off San Antonio's aggressive attempt to grab groundwater from the deep and slow recharge Simsboro formation of the Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer underlying Lee, Bastrop, Burleson and Milam counties. The mass movement of this water affects millions of central Texans from Bryan-College Station to Hays County to San Antonio.

Tomorrow night, Lost Pines GCD is expected to capitulate to End Op, L.P's permit demand for 46,000 acre-feet of groundwater per year (about 15 billion gallons). End Op's permit, together with the already permitted Vista Ridge "San Antone Hose" for 50,000 acre-feet by Post Oak Savannah GCD could usher in private water marketers' strategy to have the Legislature roll over for the "California Water Model", a proven disaster.

Landowners, residents and a number of community organizations are preparing for an accelerated clash in the courts, giving rise to a new non-profit organization, the Simsboro Aquifer Water Defense Fund.

Who:  Founders of Simsboro Aquifer Water Defense Fund

What:  Lost Pines GCD Final Hearing on End Op, L.P. 46,000 AFY permit

Where:  Bastrop City Hall, 1311 Chestnut, Bastrop, TX

When:  Wednesday, August 10, 6 pm

More background from Environmental Stewardship provided here.
#

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Correction from Simsboro Aquifer Water Defense Fund

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STATEMENT OF SIMSBORO AQUIFER WATER DEFENSE FUND RE BASTROP ADVERTISER ARTICLE, JULY 21, 2016
(Note: This message is posted here on behalf of SAWDF, as their website is currently under construction.)

The newly-formed Simsboro Aquifer Water Defense Fund (SAWDF) wants to set the record straight on a misleading front page article in this week’s Bastrop Advertiser. SAWDF has also challenged the Advertiser to correct the story.

The article was based on SAWDF’s recent press release announcing its formation and fundraising campaign. However, the article erroneously described SAWDF’s plans to include intervening in the pending City of Bastrop/XS Ranch permit application at Lost Pines Groundwater Conservation District (Lost Pines).

Contrary to statements in the article, SAWDF and its organizers have absolutely no involvement in the City of Bastrop's dispute with landowners over the City’s plan to pump 2,000 acre-feet of groundwater per year for local use. We regret any confusion the article caused.

While SAWDF will monitor local use permits, groundwater export projects will receive the most attention. These projects pose the bigger threat, aquifer-wide, because they require heavy pumping of the aquifer and permanently remove huge amounts of water every year.e article caused.mit to similar projects in other counties.21, 2016 well as individual county lines.

SAWDF’S mission is to educate and assist those who want to protect their local water supply and preserve the Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer, including the mighty Simsboro aquifer that runs under several Central Texas counties. Our efforts will include assisting and supporting landowners who want to protect their property rights to the groundwater beneath their land for the benefit of all of us.

The article should have focused on our immediate efforts to raise funds to assist what could be a long battle involving very important legal issues. SAWDF will provide financial assistance to local landowners who are trying to become parties to the End Op contested case hearing. They are appealing Lost Pines’ denial of their right to challenge the permit, with a hearing in Bastrop District Court expected this fall.

End Op is seeking a permit to export 46,000 acre-feet of groundwater (almost 15 billion gallons) per year from Lee and Bastrop counties. Because the impacts of massive pumping in the Simsboro extend beyond individual county lines, SAWDF’s outreach will also extend beyond the End Op permit to similar projects in Burleson, Milam and other counties over the Carrizo-Wilcox.

We hope the Advertiser is able to correct their erroneous report so as not to hamper SAWDF’s efforts at this very early and therefore fragile stage of our efforts.

 

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Water Conservation Scorecard Released

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Contact: Matt Johnson (512) 605-6376 or matt.johnson@sierraclub.org

Spanish:  Paula Paciorek (832) 776-5840 or ppaciorek@galvbay.org

Texas Living Waters Unveils First Ever Water Conservation Scorecard

Wide disparity of effort, information among water utilities

Austin, TX - The Texas Living Waters Project, a partnership of the National Wildlife Federation, Sierra Club, and Galveston Bay Foundation, today released the first-of-its-kind Texas Water Conservation Scorecard, an in-depth analysis and ranking of the water conservation efforts of more than 300 water utilities in Texas. Based on publicly available information, the Scorecard revealed a wide disparity of effort and information on what is being done to conserve the Lone Star state’s most precious resource: water.

The Scorecard is primarily an evaluation of utilities based largely on their level of effort to advance water conservation, and to a lesser extent on their achievements. Scoring criteria included a utility’s compliance with water conservation planning and reporting requirements, its record on water loss and meeting targets for water use reduction, outdoor watering limits, and rate-based incentives for efficient use of water. Large and medium-size utilities (serving 25,000 customers or more) were evaluated on ten criteria while smaller utilities (serving less than 25,000) were rated on six criteria.

“We found that there were a handful of water utilities in Texas that are really doing a great job, but most utilities need to increase their efforts,” said Jennifer Walker, Water Resources Program Manager at the Sierra Club’s Lone Star Chapter. “We hope that the Scorecard assists utilities in identifying areas to improve and enhance their water conservation programs. This report is meant to encourage all utilities to improve their water conservation programs because Texans cannot rest on our laurels when it comes to conserving our water resources.”

Some of the Scorecard’s findings included:

  • The quality, detail, and public accessibility of the water conservation plans that most utilities are required to submit to the State of Texas vary widely.
  • Approximately 40 percent of the utilities reported a loss of more than 11 percent of the water pumped in their system. Twenty percent of that group reported a loss of more than 15 percent.
  • During 2009-2013, more than half of utilities serving at least 25,000 people beat their water use reduction targets, although drought restrictions were a likely key factor. However, only about 13 percent of these utilities either reached or went beyond the per capita water use target recommended by the state.
  • Roughly two-thirds of these utilities set a per capita reduction target below the minimum rate of progress recommended by the state.
  • Only about one-third of these utilities placed any limitation on outdoor landscape watering except during drought periods, even though outdoor watering accounts for substantial increases in summertime water use, which spurs development of additional costly water infrastructure.

“Most utilities have more options to conserve water than they are using,” said Ken Kramer, Water Resources Chair of the Sierra Club’s Lone Star Chapter. “There are innovative programs in Texas for financing conservation and water loss control, but most utilities have not adopted more than a handful of the best conservation practices in a State guidebook. Utilities have more tools in the water conservation toolbox than ever before - this is the time to use those tools to build a stronger framework for our state’s water future.”

The top five scores (80 and above) among large and medium-size utilities belonged to:

  • City of Austin (90)
  • City of San Marcos (85)
  • City of Frisco (82)
  • City of San Angelo (81)
  • City of Lewisville (80)

Seventeen large and medium-size utilities received a score of 40 or lower, which corresponds to negligible evidence of participation in water conservation efforts.

“Texas would be in much better shape if water conservation plans, summaries, and progress reports were standardized. But more important than that is the need to intensify efforts across the board,” said Tom Spencer, Texas Living Waters Program Director for the National Wildlife Federation. “The State of Texas should provide more resources for small water utilities in educating their customers on water use and conservation, and our organizations stand ready to support and raise awareness of best practices.”

“We acknowledge and appreciate the work that water utilities have done to advance water conservation in Texas,” said Walker. “Many utilities are developing creative and innovative programs to do more with the water they have, thus preserving and extending Texas’ water supply, saving customers money, and protecting Texas’ environment.”

###

For the Scorecard interactive webpages and PDF of the report visit: www.texaswaterconservationscorecard.org

For more on the Texas Living Waters Project visit:
www.texaslivingwaters.org

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